Tue, Jun 27, 2017 | updated 11:00 AM IST

Most doctors don't believe artificial intelligence can replace human doctors

Updated: Aug 23, 2016 17:36 IST      
Most doctors don't believe artificial intelligence can replace human doctors

New Delhi, Aug. 23 (ANI): In today's world, we are heavily dependent on artificial intelligence in our day-to-day living.

Featuring, "Watson correctly diagnoses women after doctors were stumped", Curofy ran a poll within its community to find out if doctors in medicine could be replaced by artificial intelligence majorly if not completely.

Although, not a very thin line, the difference in opinions was not more than 15 percent whereby out of 5725 poll participants 43 percent doctors opined that AI will indeed replace human doctors and 57 percent doctors disagreed with that notion.

"From the most basic street and traffic signals to robots performing surgeries - artificial intelligence has penetrated almost every aspect of our daily lives. But, AI technology is not designed to replace doctors but to amplify their proficiency, intuition and the knowledge, said Pawan Gupta, co-founder of Curofy.

"Artifical Intelligence/Automation has made things extremely easy compared to prior times," he added

For example, using artificial intelligence while performing a Root Canal Treatment guides the doctor with regard to how far the instrument is from reaching the top of the root, i.e. it helps with determining the position of where exactly the instrument is within the tooth.

This was not possible previously where an X-ray determined a vague approximation to the instrument positioning while performing the procedure, thus leaving a great deal of estimation on the doctor.

This has also reduced exposure to radiation due to overcoming the need of multiple X-rays during the procedure, along with saving the time and energy of the doctors" said Dr. Amit Bhatt.

"Agreed that artificial intelligence has made everyone's lives, including doctors', quite easy; I believe there will always be finer aspects in medicine where only a human doctors' intelligence, expertise and knowledge of previous cases will be called into to diagnose and treat certain conditions. There will always be the need of a human doctor to validate the diagnoses and treatment plans proposed by artificial intelligence" said Dr. Rohan Khandelwal from W Pratiksha Hospital.

"I do not think that AI will overpower medical minds. However it is more of a social concern as a lot of people will be losing on their jobs, on account of artificial intelligence. Nowadays with excellent artificial intelligence voice recognition technology will take away medical transcription jobs as well. So, although we are headed towards an age of artificial intelligence domination it is not a good idea for our society." said Dr. Jayant Arora from Columbia Asia Hospital. (ANI)

Study finds why osteoarthritis is more common in females

Updated: Jun 27, 2017 07:31 IST     

Washington D.C. [USA], June 27 (ANI): Osteoarthritis -- a disease of joints -- is reported more among women than men. According to experts, fluid in the knee holds clues why women are more prone to it.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], June 27 (ANI): According to a new study, premature infants still have a greater risk compared to full-term babies of dying of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and other sleep-related infant deaths.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], June 27 (ANI): A recent study has found that early antiretroviral treatment (ART) at the time of diagnosis may lead greater bone loss compared with deferring ART.

Full Story >>

Untreated polyarthritis can deform joints permanently

Updated: Jun 26, 2017 13:45 IST     

New Delhi [India], June 26 (ANI): Chikungunya, the bone breaking fever, being one of the reasons for polyarthritis , may become a rampant disorder.

Full Story >>

Education, training needed to help human trafficking victims

Updated: Jun 26, 2017 12:17 IST     

Washington D.C. [USA], Jun 26 (ANI): Knowing a little bit more about human trafficking could help save someone and so, a recent research has highlighted the need for education and training.

Full Story >>

Boozing makes ageing clock tick faster

Updated: Jun 26, 2017 10:57 IST     

Washington D.C. [USA], Jun 26 (ANI): Next time you reach for that glass of whiskey, you may want to rethink as a recent research has revealed that the more alcohol you drink, the more your cells appear to age.

Full Story >>

Improving cancer detection with help of body noise

Updated: Jun 26, 2017 07:40 IST     

Washington D.C. [USA], Jun 26 (ANI): According to a recent research, body's own 'seismic noise' can help improve the cancer detection.

Full Story >>

Wound healing goes up in cigarette smoke

Updated: Jun 26, 2017 07:35 IST     

Washington D.C. [USA], Jun 26 (ANI): When it comes to wound healing, vaping may be better than cigarette smoking, according to a recent research.

Full Story >>

Paracetamol during pregnancy can put unborn boys at risk

Updated: Jun 25, 2017 14:45 IST     

New Delhi [India] June 24, (ANI): Pregnant? You may want to rethink popping those paracetamol pills as a recent study has suggested that doing so can harm the masculinity of your unborn son.

Full Story >>

Excessive texting is bad for your wrists

Updated: Jun 25, 2017 11:48 IST     

New York [US], June 25 (ANI): Texting, the thing we do most with our phones, takes a toll on our health.

Full Story >>

Ozone exposure ups autism odds in at-risk people

Updated: Jun 24, 2017 19:47 IST     

Washington D.C. [USA], Jun 24 (ANI): Elevated exposure to ozone can put individuals with high levels of genetic variation at an even higher risk for developing autism than would be expected by adding the two risk factors together, according to a recent analysis.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], June 24 (ANI): People suffering from advanced kidney cancer, we have some good news for you.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], June 24 (ANI): In a recent study, leisure activities like going for a walk outside, reading, listening to music and other fun activities can reduce blood pressure for elderly caregivers of spouses with Alzheimer's disease.

Full Story >>

Anti-epilepsy drug to treat Alzheimer's disease?

Updated: Jun 24, 2017 10:09 IST     

Washington D.C. [USA], June 24 (ANI): According to a recent study, the scientists have tested an anti-epileptic drug for its potential impact on the brain activity of patients with mild Alzheimer's disease.

Full Story >>

Take these measures to keep oral cancer at bay

Updated: Jun 23, 2017 16:04 IST     

New Delhi [India], June 23 (ANI): Oral Cancer is one of the most prevalent forms of cancer in India. Evidence suggests that India bears the largest burden of oral cancers in the world, with an incidence of around 11.28 percent in Indian men.

Full Story >>

Don't eat but sleep, to beat office blues!

Updated: Jun 23, 2017 10:59 IST     

Washington D.C. [USA], June 23 (ANI): Stressful day at work leads to binge-eating at night. A new study suggests a good night's sleep can serve as a protecting factor between job stress and unhealthy eating in the evening.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], June 23 (ANI): According to a recent clinical trial, intensive blood pressure lowering benefits patients with chronic kidney disease.

Full Story >>

New Delhi, [India], June 22 (ANI): J K Organization, in collaboration with Pushpawati Singhania Hospital and Research Institute Multispecialty Hospital, organized a two-day blood donation camp in New Delhi to collect 4043 units of blood.

Full Story >>

Can your blood group predict heart attack risk?

Updated: Jun 22, 2017 13:12 IST     

New Delhi [India], June 22 (ANI): India is presently witnessing nearly two million heart attacks annually. A heart attack (clinically known as myocardial infarction) is the permanent damage or death of the heart muscles due to lack of oxygen-rich blood. According to reports, heart attack kills one person in every 33 seconds in our country.

Full Story >>

Deficits in attention linked to increased alcohol use

Updated: Jun 22, 2017 13:02 IST     

Washington D.C. [USA], June 22 (ANI): Finding it hard to multi-task? Your frequency of alcohol use could be a reason.

Full Story >>