Sat, Feb 25, 2017 | updated 04:44 PM IST

Research found evidence Zika virus in eyes

Updated: Sep 07, 2016 17:34 IST

WashingtonD.C. [USA], Sept. 7 (ANI): A new study has found that Zika virus can live in eyes and has identified genetic material from the virus in tears.

The study, in mice, helps explain why some Zika patients develop eye disease including a condition known as 'uveitis' which can lead to permanent vision loss.

The study describes the effect of Zika virus infection in the eyes of mouse fetuses, newborns and adults.

The researchers now are planning complementary studies in human patients infected with the virus.

Professor Herbert S. Gasser, one of the senior authors of the study said, "Our study suggests that the eye could be a reservoir for Zika

virus. We need to consider whether people with Zika have infectious virus in their eyes and how long it actually persists."

Zika virus causes mild disease in most adults but can cause brain damage and death in fetuses.

About a third of all babies infected in utero with Zika show eye disease such as inflammation of the optic nerve, retinal damage or blindness after birth. In adults, Zika can cause conjunctivitis, redness and itchiness of the eyes and, in rare cases, uveitis.

To determine what effect Zika infection has on the eye, the researchers infected adult mice under the skin, similar to the way

humans are infected by mosquitoes and found live virus in the eyes seven days later.

These observations confirm that Zika is able to travel to the eye.

It is not yet known whether the virus typically makes that trip by crossing the blood-retina barrier that separates the eye from the

bloodstream, traveling along the optic nerve that connects the brain and the eye, or some other route.

Eye infection raises the possibility that people could acquire Zika infection through contact with tears from infected people.

The researchers found that the tears of infected mice contained Zika's RNA - the genetic material from the virus - but not infectious virus

when tested 28 days after infection.

Study's lead author Jonathan J. Miner said, "Even though we didn't find live virus in mouse tears, that doesn't mean that it couldn't be

infectious in humans. There could be a window of time when tears are highly infectious and people are coming in contact with it and able to

spread it."

The eye is an immune privileged site, meaning the immune system is less active there, to avoid accidentally damaging sensitive tissues

responsible for vision in the process of fighting infection.

Consequently, infections sometimes persist in the eye after they have been cleared from the rest of the body.

Senior author Rajendra S. Apte, said "We are planning studies in people to find out whether infectious virus persists in the cornea or

other compartments of the eye, because that would have implications for corneal transplantation."

Zika researchers are increasingly considering alternative routes of transmission because the virus is spreading more quickly than would be

expected by mosquito-borne transmission alone.

Epidemiologists can predict the spread of a disease based on known rates of transmission for related viruses and the viral level in the

bloodstreams of infected people.

By those calculations, Zika is moving unusually fast.

Professor Daimond said, "The Zika epidemic has been very explosive, more explosive than we can account for by just mosquitoes and the

level of Zika virus in human blood. Some other factor may be at play.

Sexual transmission is probably not playing a major role, but it could be some other bodily fluid - saliva, or urine or tears."

Even if human tears do not turn out to be infectious, the researchers' detection of live virus in the eye and viral RNA in tears still has

practical benefits.

Human tears potentially could be tested for viral RNA or antibodies, a less painful way to diagnose recent Zika infection than drawing blood.

The mouse eye could be used to test anti-Zika drugs.

"The advantage to using the eye is that your dosing requirements are very small, and you don't have to worry as much about effects of

larger dosages of therapeutic agents on the rest of the body such as liver toxicity," said Apte.

"If you know you have virus replicating in the eye, you can just give the drug locally and measure any change in viral replication. If you

use the eye as a model to study drug delivery or drug efficacy, you could then use the knowledge you gain to treat viral infection in

other places," he added.

The study was published in Cell Reports. (ANI)

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