Thu, Feb 23, 2017 | updated 10:22 AM IST

Hepatitis C treatment is possible for drug addicts: Study

Updated: Sep 07, 2016 17:27 IST

Washington D.C. [USA], Sept. 7 (ANI): Hepatitis C can be cured if restrictions are removed. According to Global health experts, so long as these restrictions exist, the goal of disease elimination will remain out of reach.

A new research highlights the pivotal role treatment for people, who use drugs plays in reducing hepatitis C transmission and how it can be rolled out to achieve best results in controlling the fatal disease.

Professor Jason Grebely said, "The science is clear. We now need to focus on overcoming barriers to access, and harness latest research to

implement programs that work."

"To delay further is unethical and undermines public health," he added.

If Hepatitis C is left untreated it can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. The disease affects approximately 64-103 million people around

the world and results into around 700 000 deaths per year.

In countries such as the US and Australia, hepatitis C now kills more people than HIV.

In the UK, the number of annual deaths due to hepatitis C has quadrupled since 1996.

New, highly effective curative treatments have sparked hope of a world free of hepatitis C.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) has set ambitious elimination targets of 90 percent diagnosed, 80 percent treated and a 65 percent

reduction in hepatitis C-related mortality by 2030.

In most high income countries, vast majority (80 percent) of new infections are found in people who inject drugs, but this group has

faced widespread exclusion from the new therapies.

Reasons given for this exclusion include the price of new medications, fears of poor adherence, fears of reinfection and concerns over

efficacy.

However, international research debunks these myths.

The world's largest study of new hepatitis C curative therapies has recently found that illicit drug use prior to and during hepatitis C

therapy had no impact on the effectiveness of the therapy, and that reinfection is low, at 4 percent.

The results also showed excellent treatment adherence. Cure rates were comparable to results in hepatitis C populations that exclude people

who use drugs.

Further, mathematical modelling suggests that even moderate levels of treatment uptake in people who use drugs could offer considerable

prevention benefits.

Another study looking at Scotland, Australia and Canada indicated a 3-5 fold increase in treatment uptake among people who inject drugs

could halve hepatitis C prevalence in 15 years.

Other studies are based on people who inject drugs in the UK and France concluded realistic treatment scale-up could achieve 15-50%

reduction in chronic hepatitis C prevalence in a decade.

To add to the benefits, treating people, who use drugs with moderate or mild hepatitis C with new therapies is cost-effective in most

settings compared to delaying until cirrhosis.

Several countries have introduced hepatitis C elimination programs, with Australia, France and Iceland offering unrestricted access.

All eyes are now turned on Australia, where over 20 000 people (10 percent of the chronic HCV population) have initiated treatment in the

first four months since subsidised treatment has become available.

Professor Olav Dalgard said,"Countries such as Australia and France have taken the lead in adopting evidence-based policies that will save

lives. Now it's time for other countries, including the US and Norway, to follow their lead and allow all patients with chronic hepatitis C

to be treated with the new drugs.

"We strongly recommend that all restrictions on access to new hepatitis C treatments based on drug or alcohol use or opioid

substitution treatment be removed. There is no good ethical or health based evidence for such discriminations. Nor do the restrictions make

clinical, public health or health economic sense," he said.

"Providing treatment to people who inject drugs, integrated with harm reduction programs and linkage to care, is the key to hepatitis C

program success. And our experience in Copenhagen shows this can work.

Such efforts need to be initiated and scaled up globally," added.

The study was presented at 5th International Symposium on Hepatitis C in Substance Users. (ANI)

Now, you can cure insomnia with placebo: Study

Updated: Feb 23, 2017 06:27 IST

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Updated: Feb 22, 2017 14:18 IST

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Drinking too much may age arteries over time!

Updated: Feb 22, 2017 06:03 IST

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Chronic knee pain may be treated online

Updated: Feb 21, 2017 06:41 IST

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Children inherit obesity from parents: Study

Updated: Feb 20, 2017 14:54 IST

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No difference between good or bad diet: Study

Updated: Feb 20, 2017 05:54 IST

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People with ADHD may have smaller brain volume

Updated: Feb 19, 2017 07:09 IST

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Dads-to be face greater risk of depression

Updated: Feb 19, 2017 06:53 IST

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New Delhi [India], Feb 19. (ANI): Do you find it difficult hearing out people at a noisy bar or a restaurant even though you have passed the hearing test with flying colors? Well, you might be secretly deaf!

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