Thu, Feb 23, 2017 | updated 01:53 AM IST

New HIV infections stagnating globally at 2.5 million per year

Updated: Jul 20, 2016 14:18 IST

Washington D.C, Jul 20 (ANI): Deaths from HIV/AIDS may have been steadily declining from a peak in 2005, but that doesn't mean the disease rates are going down.

A major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease 2015 (GBD 2015) study, 2.5 million people worldwide became newly infected with HIV in 2015, a number that hasn't changed substantially in the past 10 years.

The new GBD estimates show a slow pace of decline in new HIV infections worldwide, with a drop of just 0.7 percent a year between 2005 and 2015 compared to the fall of 2.7 percent a year between 1997 and 2005.

Improvements and updates in GBD's data sources and methodology indicate that the number of people living with HIV has been increasing steadily from 27.96 million in 2000 to 38.8 million in 2015. Annual deaths from HIV/AIDS have been declining at a steady pace from a peak of 1.8 million in 2005, to 1.2 million in 2015, partly due to the scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART).

Furthermore, the proportion of people living with HIV on ART increased rapidly between 2005 and 2015 from 6.4 percent to 38.6 percent for men and from 3.3 percent to 42.4 percent for women. Yet, most countries are still far from achieving the UNAIDS 90-90-90 target of 81 percent by 2020.

While the annual number of new infections has decreased since its peak at 3.3 million per year in 1997, it has stayed relatively constant at around an estimated 2.5 million a year worldwide for the past decade.

"Although scale-up of antiretroviral therapy and measures to prevent mother-to-child transmission have had a huge impact on saving lives, our new findings present a worrying picture of slow progress in reducing new HIV infections over the past 10 years", said lead author Dr Haidong Wang from the University of Washington.

"Development assistance for HIV/AIDS is stagnating and health resources in many low-income countries are expected to plateau over the next 15 years. Therefore, a massive scale-up of efforts from governments and international agencies will be required to meet the estimated $36 billion needed every year to realise the goal of ending AIDS by 2030, along with better detection and treatment programmes and improving the affordability of antiretroviral drugs," said Professor Christopher Murray.

The findings come from a comprehensive new analysis of HIV incidence, prevalence, deaths and coverage of antiretroviral therapy (ART) at the global, regional, and national level for 195 countries between 1980 and 2015 (see table 1 for country-by-country data).

Despite years of strong progress in reducing HIV at the global level, success in different countries and regions varies as the HIV epidemic has peaked and declined at different times, and depending on access to, and quality of ART, and other care.

Key regional and country GBD 2015 findings include:

In 2015, 1.8 million of new infections were in sub-Saharan Africa. Outside of Africa, south Asia accounted for 8.5 percent, southeast Asia for 4.7 percent and east Asia for 2.3 percent.

Within Europe, the highest numbers of new infections in 2015 were in Russia, Ukraine, Spain, Portugal, UK, Italy and Germany.

Between 2005 and 2015, 74 countries experienced a rise in age-standardised incidence rates, notably in Indonesia and the Philippines, north Africa and the Middle East, and eastern Europe, but also in some countries in western Europe (Spain and Greece).

In 2015, especially high rates of incidence (new infections in 2015 divided by the total population) were recorded in southern Africa, with more than 1 percent of the population becoming infected with HIV in Botswana, Lesotho, and Swaziland, compared with around 39 per 100000 in Ethiopia and 42 per 100000 in Congo.

In 2015, the highest incidence rates in Europe were in Russia (exceeding 20 per 100000), while Cambodia (above 46 per 100000) had the highest rates in Asia. In parts of Latin America and the Caribbean (Belize, Guyana, and Haiti), rates exceed 50 per 100000 people.

No country has achieved the UNAIDS 90-90-90 target that 81 percent of people living with HIV should be receiving ART by 2020 yet, Sweden (76 percent), the USA, Netherlands, and Argentina (all at about 70 percent) are close.

ART coverage is highly variable and massive scale-up of treatment is needed in the Middle East, north Africa, eastern Europe, and east Asia where only around a fifth of people living with HIV receive ART, and in central Asia where treatment reaches less than a third of people with HIV.

Although global HIV mortality has been declining at 5.5 percent a year since the mid-2000s, progress has been mixed between regions and countries. In sub-Saharan Africa, for example, mass scale-up of ART and interventions to prevent mother-to-child transmission have led to huge declines in HIV death rates over the past decade, while in many countries in north Africa and the Middle East like Morocco, Egypt, Iraq, Syria, and Tunisia, progress has been nonexistent.

The study, which was launched at the International AIDS meeting in Durban, South Africa, is published in The Lancet HIV journal. (ANI)

New Delhi [India], Feb. 22 (ANI): In rarest of its kind, a paediatric surgery performed by doctors at a city-based hospital gave a new lease of life to a newborn, suffering from a life-threatening defect of the alimentary canal.

Full Story >>

Beware! Zika can be a reason for miscarriage

Updated: Feb 22, 2017 14:18 IST

Washington D.C. (USA), Feb. 22 (ANI): Beware to-be mothers! According to a recent study, Zika virus could lead to a greater risk of miscarriage in the early stage of pregnancy.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. (USA), Feb. 22 (ANI): Women with a rare type of epithelial ovarian or peritoneum cancer, can now take sigh of relief.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 22 (ANI): Now don't blame those chips and chocolates for you childs extra pounds, as a study says around 35-40 percent of a child's is inherited from their parents.

Full Story >>

Drinking too much may age arteries over time!

Updated: Feb 22, 2017 06:03 IST

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 22 (ANI): Excessive boozing over the years might age arteries prematurely, especially in men, putting them at an increased risk for heart disease.

Full Story >>

Chronic knee pain may be treated online

Updated: Feb 21, 2017 06:41 IST

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 21 (ANI): A study has found out that an online intervention, combining home exercise and pain-coping skills training, provided substantial clinical benefits for patients suffering from chronic knee pain.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 21 (ANI): Only exercise is not enough to maintain that figure, which is an after effect of much toil and sweat!

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb. 20 (ANI): With rising life expectancy, increasingly sedentary lifestyles and surge in incidence of obesity, India is also witnessing a resultant rise in orthopedic problems as a natural corollary.

Full Story >>

Children inherit obesity from parents: Study

Updated: Feb 20, 2017 14:54 IST

Washington D.C. (USA), Feb. 20 (ANI): A study reveals that 35-40 percent of a child's 'Body Mass Index' - how fat or thin they are - is inherited from their parents.

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb 20. (ANI): Good news for all those lazy-headed not-really-a-cleanliness-freak out there! Scientists have found out that the obsession with hygiene could even be turning some beneficial bacteria found in the human gut into "endangered species".

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb 20. (ANI): In order to persuade someone to quit smoking, it is the 'emotions' that need to be triggered rather than inciting fear in an individual.

Full Story >>

No difference between good or bad diet: Study

Updated: Feb 20, 2017 05:54 IST

New Delhi [India], Feb 20. (ANI): Ever faced a choice between Brown and white bread?

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 19 (ANI): To boost sustainability of livestock production, a study finds that gene editing - one of the newest and most promising tools of biotechnology - enables animal breeders to make beneficial genetic changes, without bringing along unwanted genetic changes.

Full Story >>

People with ADHD may have smaller brain volume

Updated: Feb 19, 2017 07:09 IST

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. (ANI): In a latest study it has been found out that people diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have smaller brain volume than those without the disorder.

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. (ANI): What if we tell you that scientists can actually slow down the process of ageing. Sounds too good to be true right?

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. (ANI): Lefty or righty? Well it was decided when you were still in your mum's womb!

Full Story >>

Dads-to be face greater risk of depression

Updated: Feb 19, 2017 06:53 IST

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. (ANI): Expecting a baby is always a joyous experience for both the mother and the father, however a latest study has found out that fathers-to-be can be at risk of depression symptoms if they feel stressed or are in poor health.

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. (ANI): Do you find it difficult hearing out people at a noisy bar or a restaurant even though you have passed the hearing test with flying colors? Well, you might be secretly deaf!

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. (ANI): What if we told you that rice has the potential of carrying arsenic and is more than hazardous to feed it to infants!

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 18 (ANI): Now you can save your kid from surgery, as a study shows that antibiotics may be an effective treatment for acute non-complicated appendicitis in children, instead of surgery.

Full Story >>