Thu, Mar 23, 2017 | updated 05:38 AM IST

Inflammation triggers immune response to chronic viral infection

Updated: Oct 23, 2016 13:53 IST

Washington D.C. [US], Oct. 23 (ANI): Scientists from the University of Basel discovered a fundamental new mechanism that helped in explaining the inadequate immune defense against chronic viral infection.

The results may open up new avenues for vaccine development.

In the course of an infection or upon vaccination, specialized cells of our immune system, so-called B cells, produce antibodies that bind viruses and inactivate them.

In the context of chronic viral infections such as HIV or hepatitis C virus, however, antibody production by B cells is quantitatively inadequate and starts too late.

A team of scientists headed by Daniel Pinschewer reported that the inadequate antibody response to chronic viral diseases is due to the strong inflammatory reaction upon infection.

While most pronounced at the onset of an infection, inflammation can persist for decades, especially in HIV/AIDS.

Hasty immune response lasts short-term:

Under the influence of inflammatory messengers, so called interferons, B cells produce as many antibodies as they possibly can.

Unfortunately, this hasty response occurs at the expense of sustainability.

B cells that turn on antibody production too quickly lose their potential to proliferate and die shortly thereafter.

As a consequence, the immune response takes an impetuous start but subsides rapidly.

The scientists assume that this panic reaction of B cells reflects a mechanism ensuring an optimized response to acute life threatening infections.

In the context of chronic infections, however, the battle is not decided within a matter of days but rather only after months or years.

Under these circumstances, the hasty reaction of our body seems inappropriate and may actually favor the virus.

Cornerstone for new vaccines: For viral diseases such as HIV or hepatitis C protective vaccines remain unavailable.

The scientists are hopeful that the discovery of this fundamental mechanism may provide a basis to improve vaccination strategies against chronic viral diseases.

The study was published in Immunol.1 journal. (ANI)

Hepatitis drug can help cut Ebola death rate

Updated: Mar 22, 2017 09:30 IST

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 22 (ANI): A class of drugs used to treat hepatitis and some forms of multiple sclerosis has shown promise in treating Ebola.

Full Story >>

Weekend surgery 'not riskier'

Updated: Mar 22, 2017 09:20 IST

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 22 (ANI): Day of the week has no impact on the survival chances of people undergoing emergency surgery, a new research has found.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 22 (ANI): Despite existing prevention methods, transmission of infections with HIV, hepatitis B, syphilis or rubella from mother to child before and during birth as well as in infancy still occur across Europe.

Full Story >>

Changes in blood may spur Alzheimer's disease

Updated: Mar 22, 2017 07:29 IST

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 22 (ANI): A recent study has linked changes in the vascular system to Alzheimer's disease.

Full Story >>

Spraying onto broken hearts to heal them

Updated: Mar 22, 2017 06:45 IST

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 22 (ANI): A team of scientist has come up with a new method that may make the heart surgeries a history.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 22 (ANI): With both tourism and casual "hookup" sex on the rise among college-age adults, there's an urgent need for gender-sensitive and age-appropriate sexual health campaigns that are tailored to young women's motivations for taking sexual risks while travelling, a new study has suggested.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 21 (ANI): Now, detecting a mosquito-borne illness will be as easy as clicking a smartphone app - thanks to a team of scientists.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 21 (ANI): A team of researchers has shed some light on how infections during pregnancy may interfere with the genes linked to prenatal brain development.

Full Story >>

Soon, a faster way to treat depression

Updated: Mar 21, 2017 16:02 IST

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 21 (ANI): A new and faster way to treat depression has come closer to reality - thanks to a team of scientists.

Full Story >>

All you need to know on Colorectal Cancer!

Updated: Mar 21, 2017 08:00 IST

New Delhi [India], Mar. 21 (ANI): Colorectal cancer is also known as colon cancer, bowel cancer. It refers to a cancerous growth, lump or a tumour in the colon and the rectum. It is the second most common cancer, after adenocarcinoma.

Full Story >>

Prevent yourself from chronic kidney disease!

Updated: Mar 21, 2017 07:50 IST

New Delhi [India], Mar. 21 (ANI): Each person normally has two kidneys, which are about the size of a fist and are located on either side of the spine at the level of waist.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 20 (ANI): In over-weight people, immune cells prevalent in the fatty tissue get reduced in number which may contribute to cause diabetes and hypertension, according to a recent study.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 20 (ANI): A study finds that by combining two independent, scientifically-proven risk measurements, physicians can better predict a patient's irregular and often very fast heart rate risk of stroke or death.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 19 (ANI): According to a recent study, pulmonary embolism (PE) treatments have low rates of use across the United States.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 19 (ANI): An advanced form of image-guided radiation therapy, known as intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT), has shown early promise for the treatment of recurrent lung cancer.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 19 (ANI): Tennis elbow sufferers, if the idea of going under the knife is terrifying, then you can opt for non-operative approaches as a recent study has suggested that surgery may not offer additional benefit.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 19 (ANI): A majority of Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction patients develop posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) and now, a recent study has found how a set of biomarkers on the day of surgery may explain why some individuals have worse PTOA than others after two years.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 19 (ANI): Ablation procedures may not always fix a patient's abnormal heart rhythm completely and now, a recent study has found as to why it is so.

Full Story >>

The clot-busting drug that outperforms aspirin

Updated: Mar 19, 2017 07:42 IST

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 19 (ANI): Turns out, the blood thinner rivaroxaban is as safe as aspirin and more effective clot-buster.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Mar. 18 (ANI): A recent study has found that in patients on statin therapy, the addition of a cholesterol-slashing drug did not impair brain function.

Full Story >>