Sun, Feb 19, 2017 | updated 07:50 PM IST

New guidelines suggest overweight children should be screened for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Updated: Dec 02, 2016 12:20 IST

Washington D.C [US], Dec. 2 (ANI): According to a recent set of guidelines published in the Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, a screening test for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), is recommended for all obese children aged nine to eleven years.

The new guidelines, endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics, also outline recommendations for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up care of children and adolescents with NAFLD, a serious condition that may have lifelong health consequences.

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease refers to a range of conditions in which fatty deposits occur in the liver.

It can progress to a more severe form, called nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), with inflammation and/or scarring of the liver.

"NAFLD has rapidly evolved into the most common liver disease seen in the pediatric population and is a management challenge for the general pediatric practitioners, subspecialists, and health systems," said Miriam B. Vos, the lead author of the study.

Studies suggest that NAFLD may be present in 0.7 percent of two- to four-year-olds, and up to 38 percent of obese children and adolescents.

The disease is commonly associated with other obesity-related conditions: diabetes and sleep apnea.

While the long-term health impact of NAFLD remains unclear, affected children may be at increased risk for end-stage liver disease, type 2 diabetes, strokes, heart attacks, and liver cancer later in life. In adults, NAFLD has recently become the most common reason for liver transplant.

The Expert Committee performed a comprehensive research review to make evidence-based recommendations for management of pediatric NAFLD. Key recommendations include:

-Screening: The guidelines recommend screening for NAFLD in all obese children between age nine and eleven, and in children with certain risk factors.

Screening can be performed using a simple liver enzyme test (alanine aminotransferase, or ALT).

-Diagnosis: Diagnosis of NAFLD requires further tests to determine whether fat deposits (steatosis) are present and to assess other possible causes.

Testing may include obtaining a sample of liver tissue (biopsy) to check for more advanced disease (NASH or liver scarring).

-Treatment: Lifestyle changes--improving diet and increasing physical activity--are the first steps in treatment for NAFLD.

Weight loss may reduce fatty deposits in the liver. No current medications or supplements are of proven benefit for NAFLD.

Weight loss surgery (bariatric surgery) may be considered for some adolescents with severe obesity and related health problems.

-Long-term care: Recommendations for ongoing care include assessment of other obesity-related diseases and management of cardiovascular risk factors; avoidance of potential liver toxins, including binge drinking and being alert for possible psychosocial issues in children living with NAFLD.

The Expert Committee highlights important areas for further research, emphasizing the need for high-quality pediatric studies of strategies for prevention, screening, diagnosis, and treatment. (ANI)

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 19 (ANI): To boost sustainability of livestock production, a study finds that gene editing - one of the newest and most promising tools of biotechnology - enables animal breeders to make beneficial genetic changes, without bringing along unwanted genetic changes.

Full Story >>

People with ADHD may have smaller brain volume

Updated: Feb 19, 2017 07:09 IST

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. (ANI): In a latest study it has been found out that people diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have smaller brain volume than those without the disorder.

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. (ANI): What if we tell you that scientists can actually slow down the process of ageing. Sounds too good to be true right?

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. (ANI): Lefty or righty? Well it was decided when you were still in your mum's womb!

Full Story >>

Dads-to be face greater risk of depression

Updated: Feb 19, 2017 06:53 IST

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. (ANI): Expecting a baby is always a joyous experience for both the mother and the father, however a latest study has found out that fathers-to-be can be at risk of depression symptoms if they feel stressed or are in poor health.

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. (ANI): Do you find it difficult hearing out people at a noisy bar or a restaurant even though you have passed the hearing test with flying colors? Well, you might be secretly deaf!

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. (ANI): What if we told you that rice has the potential of carrying arsenic and is more than hazardous to feed it to infants!

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 18 (ANI): Now you can save your kid from surgery, as a study shows that antibiotics may be an effective treatment for acute non-complicated appendicitis in children, instead of surgery.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 18 (ANI): Attention new mommies, sing lullabies to your new born to feel more connected to your babies, suggests a study.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 18 (ANI): Cancer patients can improve their quality of life with just 30 minutes of walking, suggests a study.

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb. 17 (ANI): Birth of a baby may be a sweet moment but changing life style of women is posing 'sweet' challenge to it.

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb. 17 (ANI): Good news! A recent study shows that antibiotics may be an effective treatment for acute non-complicated appendicitis in children, instead of surgery.

Full Story >>

'Seagrass' can improve marine water quality

Updated: Feb 17, 2017 07:07 IST

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 17 (ANI): Underwater flowering plants and seagrass meadows known to produce natural antibiotics, can also improve the water quality of sea by suppressing pollution, reveals a study.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 17 (ANI): Before undergoing hip replacements, knee replacements or hernia repairs, do not let depression or anxiety take a toll on your health, as a study finds, a patients' mental health may affect their risk of experiencing wound-related complications after surgery.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 17 (ANI): Configure the airflow velocity of your Air Conditioner to a comfortable sleeping environment, as a study reveals when airflow is directed at a human body at an insensible velocity, it may increase your heart rate and affect sleeping positions.

Full Story >>

London [UK], Feb. 17 (ANI): Consume a healthy dose of vitamin D supplements during winters, as a study finds that taking them may protect you from acute respiratory infections and flu.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 17 (ANI): As a saying, "beauty is skin deep" sounds fair, but in the real world where money is top priority, physical attractiveness might have a lot more prominence than just inner beauty.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 17 (ANI): We never decide first and then react in a situation, we react according to the present state of mind!

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb.16 (ANI): The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare and CARE India's National Workshop on TB in Delhi focused on strengthening existing partnerships, involving more partners from private sector and civil society and an outcome-based roadmap to reduce TB burden in India

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 15, ANI: A study finds that changes in the size of mitochondria in a small subset of brain cells, may play a crucial role in safely maintaining blood sugar levels.

Full Story >>