Sun, Feb 19, 2017 | updated 05:19 PM IST

New study reveals that men having prostate tumor can live without any treatment

Updated: Sep 20, 2016 10:58 IST

Washington D.C.[USA], Sept. 20 (ANI): A recent study shows that doctors suggest to 'wait and see' in thousands of men with localised prostate cancer, where the tumor hasn't spread beyond the doughnut-shaped gland.

Every year more than 47,000 British men are diagnosed with the disease, a rise from 35,000 in 2009, reports Daily Mail.

Under NICE guidelines, a wait and see policy is officially called active surveillance and should be offered as a first option when prostate cancer is considered low risk.

This means it is contained in the gland, has a Gleason score below six and the man's PSA test result is below ten.

The Gleason score is a measure of a cancer's aggressiveness (in many cases, prostate cancer grows slowly and never causes a health problem).

The PSA test measures levels of prostate-specific antigen in the blood, raised level in the test can indicate a problem with the prostate, including cancer.

If the patient's levels are rising, it can mean the cancer is growing.

The idea with active surveillance is that the patient is monitored regularly using PSA tests every few months as well as having biopsies and scans when needed.

Earlier also a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine has strengthened the case for active surveillance rather than surgery or radiotherapy.

The decade-long study by UK researchers found men with early stage prostate cancer have just as good a chance of being alive after ten years as men who have treatments, including surgery and radiotherapy, which can have unpleasant and sometimes permanent side-effects, including loss of sexual function and incontinence.

According to the charity Prostate Cancer in UK, 30 percent of men eligible for active surveillance choose it after advice from their doctors, but it could soon be many more.

An expert in the field Professor Roger Kirby, agrees that active surveillance is important in helping men with early stage prostate cancer, particularly older men with a shorter life expectancy and those with serious health conditions.

However pointing out his significant caveats, he said "You have to be confident you don't miss the window of opportunity to treat prostate cancer that is progressing. The NHS has guidelines that should help to ensure any changes are spotted, but standards can vary greatly."

According to guidelines, men under active surveillance should undergo PSA testing every three to four months in the first year, then every three to six months for the next three years.

They should also have a biopsy after 12 months.

From the fifth year, PSA should be measured every six months. The patient may also be given a digital rectal examination once a year.

After the start of active surveillance, when an MRI should be performed, there is no requirement for further scans unless symptoms change.

"We don't know if the system is robust enough and working well everywhere. The guidance is there, but might not always be followed. We know of men who have moved house and dropped off the NHS radar, only to find their cancer has spread," said expert Matthew Hobbs.

Professor Chris Eden said the complications from the treatment may also have been overplayed.

"Forty percent of my patients have erectile dysfunction before treatment for prostate cancer. In other words, a complication from treatment may be a pre- existing condition," he said.

Incontinence following surgery is usually temporary. Robert, who has five children and underwent thjis type of treatment said he had minimal problems after four months of hormone therapy and radiotherapy.

"I developed man boobs during the hormone injections, but they went away," he said.

He has osteoporosis as a result of hormone therapy and suffers "aches and pains, but it was worth it for the peace of mind. Active surveillance can mean you are on edge waiting for the next test results."

Professor Kirby believes active surveillance will be more widely used, but said "the only people who should be offered it are those who are genuinely low-risk - not all localised prostate cancer is low-risk."

'In fact, it may be an aggressive form of tumour. I'm not confident the NHS has accurate enough ways to tell the difference," he added.

New genetic tests make it easier to identify aggressive early stage cancers. Prolaris, which tests for 46 genes, has been shown in studies to accurately predict the aggressiveness of a patient's prostate tumour in conjunction with Gleason scores and PSA tests.

Kirby points out that men who are advised not to have treatment but go on to develop terminal prostate cancer might sue their doctors. (ANI)

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 19 (ANI): To boost sustainability of livestock production, a study finds that gene editing - one of the newest and most promising tools of biotechnology - enables animal breeders to make beneficial genetic changes, without bringing along unwanted genetic changes.

Full Story >>

People with ADHD may have smaller brain volume

Updated: Feb 19, 2017 07:09 IST

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. (ANI): In a latest study it has been found out that people diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have smaller brain volume than those without the disorder.

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. (ANI): What if we tell you that scientists can actually slow down the process of ageing. Sounds too good to be true right?

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. (ANI): Lefty or righty? Well it was decided when you were still in your mum's womb!

Full Story >>

Dads-to be face greater risk of depression

Updated: Feb 19, 2017 06:53 IST

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. (ANI): Expecting a baby is always a joyous experience for both the mother and the father, however a latest study has found out that fathers-to-be can be at risk of depression symptoms if they feel stressed or are in poor health.

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. (ANI): Do you find it difficult hearing out people at a noisy bar or a restaurant even though you have passed the hearing test with flying colors? Well, you might be secretly deaf!

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb 19. (ANI): What if we told you that rice has the potential of carrying arsenic and is more than hazardous to feed it to infants!

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 18 (ANI): Now you can save your kid from surgery, as a study shows that antibiotics may be an effective treatment for acute non-complicated appendicitis in children, instead of surgery.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 18 (ANI): Attention new mommies, sing lullabies to your new born to feel more connected to your babies, suggests a study.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 18 (ANI): Cancer patients can improve their quality of life with just 30 minutes of walking, suggests a study.

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb. 17 (ANI): Birth of a baby may be a sweet moment but changing life style of women is posing 'sweet' challenge to it.

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb. 17 (ANI): Good news! A recent study shows that antibiotics may be an effective treatment for acute non-complicated appendicitis in children, instead of surgery.

Full Story >>

'Seagrass' can improve marine water quality

Updated: Feb 17, 2017 07:07 IST

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 17 (ANI): Underwater flowering plants and seagrass meadows known to produce natural antibiotics, can also improve the water quality of sea by suppressing pollution, reveals a study.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 17 (ANI): Before undergoing hip replacements, knee replacements or hernia repairs, do not let depression or anxiety take a toll on your health, as a study finds, a patients' mental health may affect their risk of experiencing wound-related complications after surgery.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 17 (ANI): Configure the airflow velocity of your Air Conditioner to a comfortable sleeping environment, as a study reveals when airflow is directed at a human body at an insensible velocity, it may increase your heart rate and affect sleeping positions.

Full Story >>

London [UK], Feb. 17 (ANI): Consume a healthy dose of vitamin D supplements during winters, as a study finds that taking them may protect you from acute respiratory infections and flu.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 17 (ANI): As a saying, "beauty is skin deep" sounds fair, but in the real world where money is top priority, physical attractiveness might have a lot more prominence than just inner beauty.

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 17 (ANI): We never decide first and then react in a situation, we react according to the present state of mind!

Full Story >>

New Delhi [India], Feb.16 (ANI): The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare and CARE India's National Workshop on TB in Delhi focused on strengthening existing partnerships, involving more partners from private sector and civil society and an outcome-based roadmap to reduce TB burden in India

Full Story >>

Washington D.C. [USA], Feb. 15, ANI: A study finds that changes in the size of mitochondria in a small subset of brain cells, may play a crucial role in safely maintaining blood sugar levels.

Full Story >>