Want to fight the flab? Get 'painful' miracle tongue patch

   Aug 5, 11:03 am

Sydney, Aug. 05 (ANI): A doctor has created a "miracle patch," which is sewn into the tongue and is apparently so painful that it makes eat solid food almost impossible.

The patch has been promoted as an alternative to drastic weight loss measures like gastric bypass surgery or the lap band has been priced at 2000 dollars.

Los Angeles plastic surgeon Dr Nikolas Chugay, creator of the patch, told the Sydney Morning Herald that with stitches, the reversible procedure makes chewing of solid foods difficult and painful, and limits the patient to a liquid diet.

He also gives his patients an easy to follow liquid diet plan to maximise weight loss results.

The patch must be taken off after a month so that it does not get incorporated into the tongue; it also has various side effects including sleep and speech difficulties.

Blythe O'Hara, who researches behavioural change at the University of Sydney, is not a fan of the " miracle patch ," and said that it seemed an extreme way to go about to lose weight and the method did little to help a person make lifestyle changes that can be sustained over the long term. (ANI)

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