Professional tooth scaling can cut risk of heart attack, stroke

   Nov 14, 10:14 am

Washington, Nov 14 (ANI): A new study from Taiwan has found that professional dental cleaning reduces risk of heart attacks and strokes.

Among more than 100,000 people, those who had their teeth scraped and cleaned (tooth scaling) by a dentist or dental hygienist had a 24 percent lower risk of heart attack and 13 percent lower risk of stroke compared to those who had never had a dental cleaning.

The participants were followed for an average of seven years.

Scientists considered tooth scaling frequent if it occurred at least twice or more in two years; occasional tooth scaling was once or less in two years.

"Protection from heart disease and stroke was more pronounced in participants who got tooth scaling at least once a year," said Emily (Zu-Yin) Chen, M.D., cardiology fellow at the Veterans General Hospital in Taipei, Taiwan.

Professional tooth scaling appears to reduce inflammation-causing bacterial growth that can lead to heart disease or stroke , she said.

The study was presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2011. (ANI)

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