Discovery of how we taste salt could save lives

   Feb 17, 4:11 pm

London, Feb 17 (ANI): A scientific discovery on how our mouths taste salt could save thousands of lives each year.

The finding could not only dramatically reduce the amount of salt we eat but lead to food which tastes just as good.

Scientists at the University of Nottingham discovered how crisps break down in our mouths.

They found that the "salt burst" of flavour is released 20 seconds after chewing begins - often after we have already swallowed.

"Our aim is to develop a series of technologies that accelerate the delivery of salt to the tongue by moving the burst from 20 seconds to within the time that you normally chew and swallow," the Daily Express quoted head researcher Dr Ian Fisk as saying.

"This would mean that less salt would be needed to get the same amount of taste," he said.

"This shows many products are needlessly high in salt. Most of it is swallowed before it's even tasted," said Katharine Jenner, campaign director of Consensus Action on Salt and Health. (ANI)

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