Cosmetics and plastics can double risk of type-2 diabetes

   Apr 13, 11:38 am

Washington, April 13 (ANI): Phthalates found in cosmetics and plastics can increase the risk of developing diabetes among seniors, researchers say.

Even at a modest increase in circulating phthalate levels, the risk of diabetes is doubled, a study by researchers at Uppsala University found.

"Although our results need to be confirmed in more studies, they do support the hypothesis that certain environmental chemicals can contribute to the development of diabetes," said Monica Lind, associate professor of environmental medicine at the Section for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University.

Together with Lars Lind, professor of medicine at Uppsala University, she has analysed new information from the so-called PIVUS study, which covers more than 1 000 70-year-old women and men in Uppsala.

In a physical examination participants were examined for fasting blood sugar and various insulin measures. They submitted blood samples for analysis of various environmental toxins, including several substances formed when the body breaks down so-called phthalates.

Most people come into daily contact with phthalates as they are used a softening agents in plastics and as carriers of perfumes in cosmetics and self-care products.

As expected, diabetes was more common among participants who were overweight and had high blood lipids. But the researchers also found a connection between blood levels of some of the phthalates and increased prevalence of diabetes, even after adjusting for obesity, blood lipids, smoking, and exercise habits.

Individuals with elevated phthalate levels had roughly twice the risk of developing diabetes compared with those with lower levels. They also found that certain phthalates were associated with disrupted insulin production in the pancreas.

"However, to find out whether phthalates truly are risk factors for diabetes, further studies are needed that show similar associations. Today, besides the present study, there is only one small study of Mexican women. But experimental studies on animals and cells are also needed regarding what biological mechanisms might underlie these connections," said Lind.

The results were published in the journal Diabetes Care. (ANI)

New progress in treatment for Dengue fever Aug 1, 1:44 pm
Washington, Aug 1 (ANI): A new study has found that the seeds of the Moreton Bay Chestnut tree contain a medicine called Celgosivir, which is commonly considered safe for people suffering from dengue virus.
Full Story
MACS rebuts CAG report on HIV positive cases rising to 40,855 in Manipur Aug 1, 10:30 am
Imphal, August 1 (ANI): Manipur AIDS Control Society (MACS) has rebutted the CAG report that was presented in Manipur legislative assembly; HIV positive cases in Manipur have increased greatly alleging the poor performance and unsatisfactory results in curbing new infections in high-risk individuals.
Full Story
Breastfeeding lowers risk of cardiovascular, metabolic diseases in kids Jul 31, 2:36 pm
Washington, July 31 (ANI): A new study has found that birth weight and breastfeeding both have implications for children's health decades later.
Full Story
Soy-rich diet helps women's heart stay healthy Jul 31, 2:35 pm
Washington, July 31 (ANI): A new study has found that a diet rich in soy helps in keeping women's heart healthy.
Full Story
Comments

LATEST STORIES
TOP VIDEO STORIES
PHOTO GALLERY