Fertility drugs 'more than double chances of kids developing leukaemia'

   Apr 24, 2:00 pm

London, April 24 (ANI): Children born to mothers who took fertility drugs to get pregnant are at increased risk of developing leukaemia, French scientists have revealed.

They found that children were 2.6 times more likely to become ill with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), the most common type of childhood leukaemia, if their mothers had been treated with ovary-stimulating drugs.

And the risk of suffering the rarer form of the disease, acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), increased by 2.3 times.

Children conceived naturally after their mothers waited more than a year to get pregnant had a 50 per cent greater-than-normal likelihood of developing ALL.

But no heightened risk of childhood leukaemia was associated either with in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) or artificial insemination, the Daily Mail reported.

The scientists cannot yet fully explain their findings, the first to show a specific link between use of fertility drugs and childhood leukaemia.

"It has always been hypothesised that assisted reproductive technologies may be involved in the onset of childhood cancer as they involve repeated treatment at the time of conception and or manipulation of the sperm and egg. And it is now established that a majority of acute leukaemia have a pre-natal (pre-birth) origin," said study leader Dr Jeremie Rudant, from the Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health at the French research institute INSERM in Villejuif, Paris.

"The findings indicate that more research is now needed to investigate more closely the link between specific types of fertility drugs and what role the underlying causes of infertility may play in the potential development of childhood leukaemia," Dr Rudant noted.

A total of 2,445 French children and their mothers took part in the study, comprising 764 children who had been diagnosed with leukaemia and 1,681 who were free of the disease.

Mothers were asked if they had taken more than a year to conceive a child, and questioned about the treatments they had received.

Use of fertility technology is increasing worldwide.

Despite a significant increase in risk, the actual number of children developing leukaemia after their mothers undergo fertility treatment remains very small.

ALL can affect children of any age but is most common between the ages of one and four. It is also more likely to affect boys than girls.

"Previous studies have suggested a link between infertility treatments and acute childhood leukaemia but there haven't been many studies, most of them have been small and they focused either on IVF or hormonal treatment. Our study was much larger and it's the first time that a specific increased risk linked to fertility drugs has been found," Dr Rudant added.

The results were presented at the Childhood Cancer 2012 conference in London, hosted by the charity Children with Cancer UK. (ANI)

New exercise regime 'Zuu' makes you crawl like bear, squat like frog and walk like gorilla Apr 25, 12:31 pm
London, Apr 25 (ANI): New Australian-born workout regime Zuu is set to help us rediscover the basic principles of movement, by combining high- interval training with exercises based on seven primal movements of pushing, pulling, bending, twisting, squatting, lunging and on our gait (walking, jogging, sprinting).
Full Story
Antimicrobial peptide-coated contact lenses could help cut risks of infections Apr 25, 10:20 am
Washington, April 25 (ANI): Researchers have said contact lenses coated with an antimicrobial peptide could help decrease the risk of contact lens-related infections.
Full Story
Oxygen diminishes heart's ability to regenerate Apr 25, 10:20 am
Washington, April 25 (ANI): Researchers has revealed that the oxygen helps the heart lose its incredible regenerative capability in adulthood.
Full Story
Increasing daily coffee consumption could help cut your type 2 diabetes risk Apr 25, 9:49 am
Washington, April 25 (ANI): Researchers including an Indian origin scientist have suggested that by increasing your daily coffee consumption you can reduce your type 2 diabetes risk.
Full Story
Comments

LATEST STORIES
TOP VIDEO STORIES
PHOTO GALLERY