85 pc employees who call in sick 'are really ailing'

   Mar 30, 1:11 pm

New York, Mar 30 (ANI): Most people who call in sick to work are legitimately ill and not goofing it, a new survey has found.

According to the survey, conducted by TheFit.com, 85 percent of employees are being honest when they say they're too ill to work, but women are more honest than men.

One in five men admitted taking sick days to loaf around, while only one in seven women told a fib.

In another gender gap, the poll found that employees are more likely to lie about sick time to a female boss.

The number 1 excuse for calling in sick was a mental health day. That's what 8 percent of women and 13 percent of men cited.

The rest said they were just playing hooky, interviewing for a new job or recovering from a hangover.

Art Papas, CEO of TheFit.com, said he was surprised that so many people are telling the truth.

"Most people who run a business think that people who call in sick are ducking out," the New York Daily News quoted Papas as saying.

"Bosses are naturally suspicious," he added. (ANI)

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