Do's and don'ts of using social media to help find jobs

   Sep 11, 2:18 pm

Washington, Sept 11 (ANI): While posting too much personal information on social media sites can trash your career, you can also leverage the platform and use it to your advantage when hunting for a job.

According to a report in Live Science, Facebook is great for showcasing your professional network memberships, but care needs to be taken to ensure groups you belong to are sending the right message.

Other benefits suggested in the report include using social networks to show their own social media acumen.

Another way to use social media to your advantage is by developing a presence on other networks, even though Facebook may be the most popular social network, the report said.

Amongst others, are ensuring making sure your profiles are complete, becoming friends with any company that you are looking to work for or already working for, showing off some of your work, and keeping a certain level of privacy, as overdoing privacy settings can also be a potential red flag against users. (ANI)

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