Slim, attractive men have less nasal bacteria than heavier counterparts

   Feb 19, 11:44 am

Washington, Feb 19 (ANI): A new study has revealed a link between Body Mass Index (BMI) and the amount of bacteria colonizing noses, suggesting that heavier men harbor more potentially pathogenic species of bacteria in their nose, compared with slimmer, more traditionally attractive men.

"According to an evolutionary point of view, traits related to attractiveness are supposed to be honest signals of biological quality," Dr. Boguslaw Pawlowski, said. "We analyzed whether nasal and throat colonization with potentially pathogenic bacteria is related to body height and BMI in both sexes."

103 healthy females and 90 healthy males participated in the study. Heights and weights were self-reported, while waist and hip circumferences were measured.

Six potentially pathogenic bacteria were isolated and identified from nasal and throat swabs. The results showed that 'colonized' men were found to have a higher BMI than non-colonized males, although no differences were found in females.

The study was published in the American Journal of Human Biology. (ANI)

Here's how you can sharpen your senses Aug 28, 5:46 pm
Washington D.C., Aug 28 (ANI): A new study claims that mental focus can encourage learning mechanisms similar to physical training.
Full Story
U.S. varsity study says 4-days a week school can produce better academicians Aug 28, 4:40 pm
Washington D.C., Aug 28 (ANI): Here's a good news for students. A new study has claimed that shortening the school week to four days school can improve the academic performance of students.
Full Story
Purple potatoes can terminate colon cancer cells Aug 27, 5:40 pm
Washington D.C., Aug 27 (ANI): In a breakthrough discovery, researchers claim that purple potatoes can prevent the spread of colon cancer and terminate its stem cells.
Full Story
Heavy metal pollution may have contributed to some of largest extinction events Aug 26, 6:29 pm
Washington D.C., Aug 26 (ANI): A 415-million-year-old malformed fossil plankton has revealed that heavy metal pollution might have contributed to some of the world's largest extinction events.
Full Story
Comments