Slim, attractive men have less nasal bacteria than heavier counterparts

   Feb 19, 11:44 am

Washington, Feb 19 (ANI): A new study has revealed a link between Body Mass Index (BMI) and the amount of bacteria colonizing noses, suggesting that heavier men harbor more potentially pathogenic species of bacteria in their nose, compared with slimmer, more traditionally attractive men.

"According to an evolutionary point of view, traits related to attractiveness are supposed to be honest signals of biological quality," Dr. Boguslaw Pawlowski, said. "We analyzed whether nasal and throat colonization with potentially pathogenic bacteria is related to body height and BMI in both sexes."

103 healthy females and 90 healthy males participated in the study. Heights and weights were self-reported, while waist and hip circumferences were measured.

Six potentially pathogenic bacteria were isolated and identified from nasal and throat swabs. The results showed that 'colonized' men were found to have a higher BMI than non-colonized males, although no differences were found in females.

The study was published in the American Journal of Human Biology. (ANI)

Early ecosystems were more complex than previously believed Nov 29, 8:01 am
Washington D.C, Nov 29 (ANI): An organism from 555 million years ago has shown that Earth's first ecosystems were more complex than previously believed.
Full Story
Human and bird's common sound production mechanism Nov 28, 2:47 pm
Washington D.C, Nov 28 (ANI): When birds and humans sing, it sounds completely different, but now new research shows that the very same physical mechanisms are at play when a bird sings and a human speaks.
Full Story
Breakthrough paves way for new Alzheimer's cure Nov 28, 1:54 pm
Washington D.C, Nov 28 (ANI): New treatments for Alzheimer's disease could be on the horizon after a team of researchers discovered how the degenerative brain condition destroys the connections between brain cells.
Full Story
How snakes got legless Nov 28, 1:37 pm
Washington D.C, Nov 28 (ANI): Analysis of a reptile fossil has helped a team of scientists solve the evolutionary mystery of how snakes lost their legs.
Full Story