Neanderthals were seafaring long before modern humans

   Mar 1, 5:27 pm

London, March1 (ANI): Neanderthals may have used the seas as a highway centuries before modern humans managed the same trick, researchers in Greece say.

Evidence suggests our extinct cousins criss-crossed the Mediterranean in boats from 100,000 years ago.

Neanderthals lived around the Mediterranean from 300,000 years ago. Their distinctive "Mousterian" stone tools are found on the Greek mainland and, intriguingly, have also been found on the Greek islands of Lefkada, Kefalonia and Zakynthos.

These lead to two assumptions, either the islands weren't islands at the time, or our distant cousins crossed the water somehow.

Now, George Ferentinos of the University of Patras in Greece says we can rule out the former.

The islands, he says, have been cut off from the mainland for as long as the tools have been on them, the New Scientist reported.

Ferentinos compiled data that showed sea levels were 120 metres lower 100,000 years ago, because water was locked up in Earth's larger ice caps.

But the seabed off Greece today drops down to around 300 metres, meaning that when Neanderthals were in the region, the sea would have been at least 180 metres deep (as reported in Journal of Archaeological Science).

Ferentinos thinks Neanderthals had a seafaring culture for tens of thousands of years. Modern humans are thought to have taken to the seas just 50,000 years ago, on crossing to Australia.

The journeys to the Greek islands from the mainland were quite short - 5 to 12 kilometres - but according to Thomas Strasser of Providence College in Rhode Island, the Neanderthals didn't stop there.

In 2008 he found similar stone tools on Crete, which he says are at least 130,000 years old. Crete has been an island for some 5 million years and is 40 kilometres from its closest neighbour - suggesting far more ambitious journeys.

Strasser agrees Neanderthals were seafaring long before modern humans, in the Mediterranean at least. He thinks early hominins made much more use of the sea than anyone suspects, and may have used the seas as a highway, rather than seeing them as a barrier.

But the details remain lost in history. Any craft were presumably made from wood, so rotted away long ago. The oldest known Mediterranean boat, a dugout canoe from Lake Bracciano in Italy, is just 7000 years old. Ferentinos speculates that Neanderthals may have made something similar.

There is a simpler explanation for how they reached the islands, suggested Paul Pettitt of the University of Sheffield, UK: maybe they just swam there. Pettitt also points out that the tools on the islands have not been chemically dated, so estimates of their age are based entirely on their design.(ANI)

Girls' puberty age depends on which parent's 'imprinted gene' they carry Jul 24, 10:35 am
Washington, July 24 (ANI): A new study has found that the puberty age of girls largely depends on which of the two parents' 'imprinted' genes they have.
Full Story
Rising temperatures hinder Indian wheat production: Study Jul 23, 5:29 pm
Southampton (United Kingdom), July 23 (ANI): Geographers at the University of Southampton have found a link between increasing average temperatures in India and a reduction in wheat production.
Full Story
NHRC organises national conference on Silicosis Jul 23, 4:25 pm
New Delhi, July 23 (ANI): The National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) this year is organizing a day-long conference on Silicosis at the India International Centre here on July 25.
Full Story
Why kids tend to be impulsive Jul 23, 4:25 pm
Washington, July 23 (ANI): A new study has linked impulsiveness in kids to brain connectivity.
Full Story
Comments

LATEST STORIES
TOP VIDEO STORIES
PHOTO GALLERY